Atonement

By raising Christ from death, God as the supreme Judge set his seal to the absolute perfection and completeness of his atoning work. The resurrection is a public announcement to the world that the penalty of death has been borne by Christ to its bitter end and that in consequence the dominion of guilt has been broken, the curse annihilated forever more.” ~ Geerhardus Vos


“The resurrection stands related to righteousness in the same way that death stands related to sin.” ~ Geerhardus Vos


“Repentance is not limited to any single faculty of the mind: it engagesthe entire man, intellect, will and affections… Again, in the new life which follows repentance the absolute supremacy of God is the controlling principle. He who repents turns away from the service of mammon and self to the service of God.” ~ Geerhardus Vos


“If the man as a character does not stand behind his act, the latter loses all value.” ~ Geerhardus Vos


“God’s names are not empty sounds (like the names of people), but they have meaning and contribute to our knowledge of God.” ~ Geerhardus Vos


“The resurrection of the Mediator shows by way of example what will occur with all the members of His body.” ~ Geerhardus Vos


“The entire man is, in his sinful state, the object of God’s displeasure.” ~ Geerhardus Vos


“Christ’s subjection to the law began at the incarnation; his entire life was a continual suffering.” ~ Geerhardus Vos


“That God would declare the sinner righteous without his own help seems foolishness to the natural man.” Geerhardus Vos


“To let the image of God’s self-revelation in the Scriptures mirror itself as fully and clearly as possible in his mind, is the first and most important duty of every theologian.” ~ Geerhardus Vos


“Jesus speaks as One who is sovereign in the sphere of truth, because He is King in the realm of realities to which the truth belongs.” ~ Geerhardus Vos


“The beginning of hungering and thirsting after righteousness lies in the birth of conviction of sin.” ~ Geerhardus Vos


“A new emotion controls the one converted, but in it he similarly has a consciousness of a deep sorrow over his former condition.” ~ Geerhardus Vos


“The essence of legalism is to dislocate the law of God from the person of God.” ~ Geerhardus Vos


“Man is so built that he must be religious either in a good or in a bad sense. Ill-religious he may, but non-religious he cannot be.” ~ Geerhardus Vos


“Where the pure proclamation of the Word exists, there the church is revealed.” ~ Geerhardus Vos


“What man fails to bring into the temple of God, he is sure to set up on the outside as a rival object of worship.” ~ Geerhardus Vos


“Our will does not work apart from our emotional life any more than the intellect works apart from the will.” ~ Geerhardus Vos


“When God re-creates man, there is in fact an enlightening of his mind, a reversing of his will, and a purifying of his affections.” ~ Geerhardus Vos


“Creating something out of nothing is an act of absolute, infinite power, something that completely transcends our concept of power” ~ Geerhardus Vos


“There are stages in good and stages in evil, but there are no stages between good and evil.” ~ Geerhardus Vos


“A sinner whose intellect was enlightened and who kept his old, completely sinful will would be the most miserable and terrifying creature” ~ Geerhardus Vos


“If God did not spare His own Son, then nothing can be too great or too difficult for His love.” ~ Geerhardus Vos


“A Christian loves much after much has been forgiven him, not the reverse: that much has been forgiven him because he loves much.” ~ Geerhardus Vos


“Believing without regeneration is no more conceivable than consciousness in a child without natural birth.” ~ Geerhardus Vos


“God must come to us before we can come to Him.” ~ Geerhardus Vos


“In all believing, there is a letting go of ourselves and a resting in another.” ~ Geerhardus Vos


“By letting it be exhausted in Himself, Christ destroyed the power of death.” ~ Geerhardus Vos


“Christ does not come as a philosopher who commends or presses his ideas but as the anointed of the Father.” ~ Geerhardus Vos


“For believers, death is a crisis event in which they obtain perfect holiness.” ~ Geerhardus Vos


“Ill-considered sacrifice can become sin.” ~ Geerhardus Vos


“Scripture nowhere ascribes to fallen man any capacity to do good of himself.” ~ Geerhardus Vos





By raising Christ from death, God as the supreme Judge set his seal to the absolute perfection and completeness of his atoning work. The resurrection is a public announcement to the world that the penalty of death has been borne by Christ to its bitter end and that in consequence the dominion of guilt has been broken, the curse annihilated forever more.” ~ Geerhardus Vos


“The resurrection stands related to righteousness in the same way that death stands related to sin.” ~ Geerhardus Vos


“Repentance is not limited to any single faculty of the mind: it engagesthe entire man, intellect, will and affections… Again, in the new life which follows repentance the absolute supremacy of God is the controlling principle. He who repents turns away from the service of mammon and self to the service of God.” ~ Geerhardus Vos


“If the man as a character does not stand behind his act, the latter loses all value.” ~ Geerhardus Vos


“God’s names are not empty sounds (like the names of people), but they have meaning and contribute to our knowledge of God.” ~ Geerhardus Vos


“The resurrection of the Mediator shows by way of example what will occur with all the members of His body.” ~ Geerhardus Vos


“The entire man is, in his sinful state, the object of God’s displeasure.” ~ Geerhardus Vos


“Christ’s subjection to the law began at the incarnation; his entire life was a continual suffering.” ~ Geerhardus Vos


“That God would declare the sinner righteous without his own help seems foolishness to the natural man.” Geerhardus Vos


“To let the image of God’s self-revelation in the Scriptures mirror itself as fully and clearly as possible in his mind, is the first and most important duty of every theologian.” ~ Geerhardus Vos


“Jesus speaks as One who is sovereign in the sphere of truth, because He is King in the realm of realities to which the truth belongs.” ~ Geerhardus Vos


“The beginning of hungering and thirsting after righteousness lies in the birth of conviction of sin.” ~ Geerhardus Vos


“A new emotion controls the one converted, but in it he similarly has a consciousness of a deep sorrow over his former condition.” ~ Geerhardus Vos


“The essence of legalism is to dislocate the law of God from the person of God.” ~ Geerhardus Vos


“Man is so built that he must be religious either in a good or in a bad sense. Ill-religious he may, but non-religious he cannot be.” ~ Geerhardus Vos


“Where the pure proclamation of the Word exists, there the church is revealed.” ~ Geerhardus Vos


“What man fails to bring into the temple of God, he is sure to set up on the outside as a rival object of worship.” ~ Geerhardus Vos


“Our will does not work apart from our emotional life any more than the intellect works apart from the will.” ~ Geerhardus Vos


“When God re-creates man, there is in fact an enlightening of his mind, a reversing of his will, and a purifying of his affections.” ~ Geerhardus Vos


“Creating something out of nothing is an act of absolute, infinite power, something that completely transcends our concept of power” ~ Geerhardus Vos


“There are stages in good and stages in evil, but there are no stages between good and evil.” ~ Geerhardus Vos


“A sinner whose intellect was enlightened and who kept his old, completely sinful will would be the most miserable and terrifying creature” ~ Geerhardus Vos


“If God did not spare His own Son, then nothing can be too great or too difficult for His love.” ~ Geerhardus Vos


“A Christian loves much after much has been forgiven him, not the reverse: that much has been forgiven him because he loves much.” ~ Geerhardus Vos


“Believing without regeneration is no more conceivable than consciousness in a child without natural birth.” ~ Geerhardus Vos


“God must come to us before we can come to Him.” ~ Geerhardus Vos


“In all believing, there is a letting go of ourselves and a resting in another.” ~ Geerhardus Vos


“By letting it be exhausted in Himself, Christ destroyed the power of death.” ~ Geerhardus Vos


“Christ does not come as a philosopher who commends or presses his ideas but as the anointed of the Father.” ~ Geerhardus Vos


“For believers, death is a crisis event in which they obtain perfect holiness.” ~ Geerhardus Vos


“Ill-considered sacrifice can become sin.” ~ Geerhardus Vos


“Scripture nowhere ascribes to fallen man any capacity to do good of himself.” ~ Geerhardus Vos






.


Profession of Faith




To profess something is to openly declare it. When we use the term profession of faith, we usually refer to a person’s public declaration of his or her intent to follow Jesus Christ as Lord and Savior. Because words do not always reflect the true condition of the heart, a profession of faith is not always a guarantee of true salvation

Romans 10:9–10 shows the value of a profession of faith in Christ: “If you declare with your mouth, ‘Jesus is Lord,’ and believe in your heart that God raised him from the dead, you will be saved. For it is with your heart that you believe and are justified, and it is with your mouth that you profess your faith and are saved.” Faith in the heart is accompanied by a profession of the mouth. Those who are saved will speak of their salvation—even when that profession could lead to death, as was the case for the Christians in Rome to whom Paul was writing.

Our part in salvation is minimal because salvation is a spiritual work performed by the Holy Spirit. Our words don’t save us. Salvation is by grace through the gift of faith (Ephesians 2:8–9), not by words we speak. Jesus’ rebuke of the Jews’ hypocrisy was based on their empty profession: “Isaiah prophesied correctly about you hypocrites, as it is written: ‘These people honor Me with their lips, but their hearts are far from Me’” (Mark 7:6).

In the days of the early church, and in many parts of the world today, confessing Jesus as Lord could be costly. Professing faith in Jesus as Messiah invited persecution, even death, for Jewish believers (Acts 8:1). That was one reason Peter denied three times that he knew Jesus (Mark 14:66–72). After Jesus rose from the dead, ascended back into heaven, and sent the Holy Spirit to indwell believers, the formerly fearful disciples confessed Jesus boldly in the streets and synagogues (Acts 1–2). Their professions of faith won converts but also brought persecution (Acts 2:1–41; 4:1–4).


They refused to stop speaking about Jesus, remembering His words: “Whoever is ashamed of me and my words, the Son of Man will be ashamed of them when he comes in his glory and in the glory of the Father and of the holy angels” (Luke 9:26). So, one purpose of our profession of faith is to declare that we are not ashamed to be called His followers.

Of course, words without a heart change are only words. A mere profession of faith, with no corresponding heart of faith, has no power to save or change us. In fact, Jesus warned that many who think they are saved because of a profession will find out some day that they were never His at all: “Not everyone who says to me, ‘Lord, Lord,’ will enter the kingdom of heaven, but only the one who does the will of my Father who is in heaven. Many will say to me on that day, ‘Lord, Lord, did we not prophesy in your name and in your name drive out demons and in your name perform many miracles?’ Then I will tell them plainly, ‘I never knew you. Away from me, you evildoers!’” (Matthew 7:21–23). So simply professing faith in Jesus, even when the profession is accompanied by good works, does not guarantee salvation. There must be repentance of sin (Mark 6:12). We must be born again (John 3:3). We must follow Jesus as Lord of our lives, by faith.

A profession of faith is the starting place for a lifetime of discipleship (Luke 9:23). There are many ways to make professions of faith, just as there are many ways to deny Jesus. He said, “I tell you, everyone who confesses Me before men, the Son of Man will also confess him before the angels of God” (Luke 12:8). One such outward profession is baptism, which is the first step of obedience in following Jesus as Lord (Acts 2:38). But baptism does not guarantee salvation, either. Thousands have been immersed, sprinkled, or dabbed with water, but that ritual cannot save. “The Spirit gives life; the flesh counts for nothing” (John 6:63). Baptism should symbolize the new life we have in Christ, the inner change of allegiance we possess. Without that new life and change of heart, baptism and other professions of faith are simply religious rituals, powerless in themselves.

Salvation occurs when the Holy Spirit moves into a repentant heart and begins His sanctifying work of making us more like Jesus (Romans 8:29). When Jesus explained this action to Nicodemus in John 3, He compared the Spirit’s moving to the wind. We cannot see the wind, but we see where it has been because it changes everything it touches. Grass moves, leaves shudder, and skin cools so that no one doubts that the wind has come. So it is with the Spirit. When He moves into a believing heart, He begins to change the believer. We cannot see Him, but we see where He has been because values move, perspectives shift, and desires begin to line up with God’s Word. We profess the Lord Jesus in everything we do and seek to glorify Him (1 Corinthians 10:31). The way we conduct our lives is a more sure profession of faith than mere words. Words are important, and a believer in Christ will be unashamed to identify as such. There were times when Jesus pressed for a verbal profession of faith (e.g., Matthew 16:15), but He also pressed for more than words: “If you continue in My word, then you are truly disciples of Mine” (John 8:31).

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The Cross and Salvation: The Doctrine of Salvation by Bruce DemarestMore insights from your Bible study - Get Started with Logos Bible Software for Free!

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Charles Town Sports Room Trains

July 6, 2016 John Hall Sr. Gave be some HO railroad tracks and houses. This lead to the beginning of my trains .

Then Mark at Toy Town in Portsmouth where I started buying old steam engines and O Gauage tracks and cars.in 2017.

Then Charity and I took a trip to see Uncle Joe Whisnant in Maysville Ind. In 2018 and bought the Amtrak train digital set.

Then I set up in the BREEZE way room the train display. 2018.

Later Chad and I took a trip to see Uncle Joe and Lewis, i them received a lot of Uncle Joe's train 🚆.

Then in 2019 started Charles Town Sports Room. The car garage was taken down and Chad worked the project.



Understanding Scripture

In no way is any truth in Scripture decided by your experiences. Whether it affects you or does not affect you subjectively has nothing to do with its truthfulness.

Now this deals a very heavy blow to vast numbers of people in professing Christianity who look at the Bible like some kind of a verbal Ouija board and run their fingers in their minds through it waiting for some kind of esoteric impulse.

And you hear people get together in a Bible study and say, “What does this verse mean to you?”

Who cares? Who are you?

The right question is, what does this mean to God? What did He say and what did He mean by what He said? Biblical truth is objective; it is true in and of itself.

Psalm 119:160 says this: “The sum of Your word is truth, And every one of Your righteous ordinances is everlasting.”

— John
MacArthur

John 3:16

Οὕτως γὰρ ἠγάπησεν ὁ Θεὸς τὸν κόσμον, ὥστε τὸν Υἱὸν τὸν μονογενῆ ἔδωκεν, ἵνα πᾶς ὁ πιστεύων εἰς αὐτὸν μὴ ἀπόληται ἀλλ’ ἔχῃ ζωὴν αἰώνιον.

The Greek text uses a participle, so a more literal reading might be everyone believing in Him ...
In the phrase:

πᾶς / ὁ πιστεύων / εἰς / αὐτὸν
Pas / ho pisteuōn / eis / auton

the ho pisteuōn literally means "the believing [one]" - it is in the singular. Pas means "every". The perfectly literal Greek is clumsy - "every the believing [one]".
The verse does not specify any particular person or race. It refers, as the text said, to everyone believing in Him. This is reiterated in verse 36 (following KJV):

He that believeth on the Son
Ho pisteuōn eis ton uion - "The [one] believing in the Son"
hath everlasting life:
echei zōēn aiōnion - "has life eternal"
And he that believeth not the Son
ho de apeithōn tō uiō - "but/and the [one] disobeying the Son"
shall not see life
ouk opsetai zōēn - "shall/will not see life"

It is interesting to note here, I think, that, contrary to many translations, the Greek text does not say:

He that believes in the Son has eternal life
And he that does not believe in the Son shall not see life

but rather

He that believes [pisteuōn] in the Son has eternal life
And he that does not OBEY [apeithōn] the Son shall not see life

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answeredDec 11 '19 at 12:19



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I don't see how most Christians define the word "whosoever" as "anybody" and "all." If the word does mean "anybody" and "all," why did the Lord Jesus Christ said in John 17:9 that He is not praying for the world, but for those whom the Father has given Him? John 17 speaks of a people whom the Father has given to the Son and to whom the Son gave His life for their eternal security (verses 2-3, 6-7, 9, 11-12, 24).
Is it rather appropriateit rather appropriate to think of the possibility that "whosoever" means all nations and that salvation is not only for the Jews but also for all kinds and sorts of people, since Jesus was talking to Nicodemus, a Jew and a Pharisee at the same time.

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[Rom 9:19-23 NKJV] 19 You will say to me then, "Why does He still find fault? For who has resisted His will?" 20 But indeed, O man, who are you to reply against God? Will the thing formed say to him who formed [it], "Why have you made me like this?" 21 Does not the potter have power over the clay, from the same lump to make one vessel for honor and another for dishonor? 22 [What] if God, wanting to show [His] wrath and to make His power known, endured with much longsuffering the vessels of wrath prepared for destruction, 23 and that He might make known the riches of His glory on the vessels of mercy, which He had prepared beforehand for glory,

A W. Pink


A Father’s Day Tribute

Arthur Pink’s father was very instrumental in bringing him into a saving knowledge of our Lord. Little is known of Thomas Clement Pink who was thirty-eight years of age when Arthur was born. The birth certificate gives the father’s profession as a corn dealer or corn miller. That he worked hard, and prospered can be judged from the fact that when Arthur was five, the family moved to a more commodious home. Arthur said, “The father of the writer was so busy that for over thirty years he never had more than three consecutive days’ holidays. He was a corn merchant, and after returning from market attended to much of the clerical work in person, so that for years he did not cease til 1150 Saturday night. Yet he did not lie in bed Sabbath mornings, but took his children to hear God’s Word preached. He did not send them to Sunday school while he took a nap in the afternoon, but gathered us around him and spent a couple of hours in reading Bunyan’s Pilgrim’s Progress, etc. Every day he conducted family worship and when we were too little to sit up for the evening our godly mother took us around her knee and prayed with us. Other memories of Sundays were of how the day began by our father reading to us God’s Word and also of how time was spent in the singing of hymns.”

Thomas Pink had a strong Christian commitment. In later years, A. W. Pink recalled, "We had a daily delivery of mail, including Sunday, which often contained important business letters, but none were opened on the Lord’s Day. No Sunday newspapers ever entered our home—not even when the war was on. When we were little all our toys were put away on Saturday night and pictorial editions of Bunyan’s “Pilgrim’s Progress” and Foxe’s “Book of Martyrs”, etc were brought out. Of course, such practices were accompanied by the warmth of devotion to Christ. “As a boy,” writes Pink, “I several times asked my father why he spent so much pain in shining his shoes, and each time he answered, “I am polishing them as though the Lord Jesus was going to wear them.”

In spite of all the Godly influence Arthur had in his home, what is clear is that as he and his younger brother and sister grew up, their early training in the Scriptures showed no signs of bearing fruit and slowly all three children drifted into lives of unbelief. To the added grief of his parents, Pink’s unbelief took a religious form. From Christianity, Arthur turned to theosophy, a cult which claimed a special knowledge preserved from generation to generation. Its best-known publication, the magazine called Lucifer, indicated clearly its anti-Christian nature and revealed the “wisdom” of Eastern religions including belief in reincarnation. Once interested, he soon became thoroughly committed and in his early twenties he was frequently found addressing cult meetings.

Meanwhile Thomas Pink was not silent. He always waited up until his son returned from meetings late in the evening and, to Arthur’s annoyance, often accompanied his “Good-night” with some brief but telling word of Scripture. One such evening, in the year 1908, as Pink hurriedly passed his father and dashed upstairs to his room, the text which he received was, “There is a way which seems right unto a man, but the end thereof are the ways of death” (Proverbs 14:12). As he shut the bedroom door, intending to do some work on a speech for an important annual conclave of theosophists, the text remained with him and so disturbed his concentration that work was impossible; all he could see mentally was “There is a way that seems right, etc.” Arthur said he could no longer reject the God of the Bible and began to cry unto the Lord in prayer, convicted by the Holy Spirit and his power to bring a soul to see his lost condition and believe in the Lord Jesus Christ as his Savior. For almost three days he did not leave his room to join the family, but his father and mother prayed, and in the late afternoon on the third day, Arthur made his appearance and his father said, “Praise God, my son has been delivered.”

Arthur’s last address among the theosophists was, in fact, a gospel sermon on the true God and Jesus Christ, his Son, in whom alone there is full salvation. That same night Pink resigned his membership of the Society and was called “insane” by its members. God had used a father’s influence and prayers to save his son's soul.

(source: “The Life of Arthur W. Pink” by Iain H. Murray)